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4 Ways to Foam Roll for Amazing Relief

Everyone knows the benefit of a foam roller, but most don’t know the different ways to use one to maximize their pain relief. Try these 4 moves to help increase your mobility and decrease your inflammation.

Front Calf Foam Roll
Most people who get down and dirty with a foam roller let the back of their leg glide over the foam roller because that’s what they’ve seen most, but foam rolling the front of the leg can decrease shin splint pain dramatically. You don’t realize how tight the front of your calf is until you start rolling on a foam roller! Be sure to end the motion before the bottom of the knee joint and the top of your ankle.

c/o: nomeatathlete

c/o: nomeatathlete

Upper Back Foam Roll
This takes a little technique, but once you know how to do it properly, it can be amazing for your mobility and the tightness you feel after deadlifts, overhead squats, and in your neck. You’ll have to gradually get into it, starting on your lower back and then moving up. Flexibility in your lower back as you continue is important, so don’t rush this move. You’ll find that a more relaxed and unknotted back plays a huge role in all of your moves, and helps your body isolate the muscles needed in a move instead of relying on the tension in your back.

Lat Foam Roll
Neglecting your lats can lead to back/neck tension and pain, and a lot of uncomfortableness. Try the back foam roll move and then turn to your side to hit your lats. Trust me, you’ll be thankful you did.

c/o: oxygenmag.com

c/o: oxygenmag.com

IT Band Foam Roll
This is a huge one that a lot of people know but not many execute well. A lot of people walk around with IT band tightness and pain, thinking that it could be soreness from a workout. Not treating IT band tightness can lead to changes in your gait, gluteal and lower back pain, and can throw off your entire body movement during lifts and running. With IT band foam rolling, you’ll want to ensure you’re directly on your band, rolling from the side of your knee joint and ending just under your hip. Be sure to never roll over joints! See blow on how to execute and feel tremendous relief!

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